Getting More Out of (and Into) Your Collections Management System: Digital Media Log

The following is the text from the talk I gave at METRO’s Annual Conference held this year on January 11, 2017. This talk was part of the panel “Getting More Out of (and Into) Your Collections Management System.”

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Share Your Story: Project Electron Update

Since Project Electron kicked off in September, we’ve made significant progress on a number of different fronts. First, together with our Marist College partners, we created a milestones document which lays out major phases of work. We also developed some general principles and overall approaches to licensing project deliverables, including code, documentation and planning documents. Since we anticipate both of these documents will change over time, we’ve versioned them using git (and have pushed a copy to GitHub) so we can keep track of those changes. Continue reading

The Master Shelf List: Where We Go From Here

For many archives, the master shelf list has been a permanent staple since their inception. We have one. It’s an ever-growing Excel spreadsheet that lists the location of every single box in our collection down to the shelf number. It’s enormous, it’s unwieldy, and it takes a ton of work to keep updated month to month. For years we’ve been looking for a way to move away from it, and the release of ArchivesSpace version 1.5 has given us the rare opportunity to move entirely away from our spreadsheet into a more structured and interoperable. The Rockefeller Archive Center will no longer enter new information into our Master Shelf List. Continue reading

Cross-Origin Resource Sharing for ArchivesSpace

We’ve written a lot on this blog about things we’re doing with the ArchivesSpace API, ranging from find and replace operations in notes to reporting on our DACS compliance across our repository. It should be pretty obvious we’re big fans of the power and flexibility it provides to automate what otherwise would be some pretty tedious and error-prone, and also that the data model is getting us to think about archival description outside of the EAD box. Continue reading

Introducing Project Electron: infrastructure for digital records

Today we’re announcing a major project to build sustainable, user-centered and standards-compliant infrastructure to support the ongoing acquisition, management and preservation of digital records so we can make them available in the broadest and most equitable way possible. Because a snappy title makes everything better, we’ve codenamed this effort Project Electron, and we even have a cool mascot (Captain Electron, discovered by our internet expert Patrick Galligan): Continue reading

DACSspace: An ArchivesSpace DACS Compliance Evaluation Tool

As the newest member of the Processing Team, I have been working on writing a DACS compliance evaluation script called DACSspace. Creating this tool came with a lot of “firsts” – this was my first experience writing code as well as interacting with an API. After a successful (yet sometimes frustrating) three months, I am excited to introduce DACSspace to the archival community and share a reflection of my work.

To view DACSspace on GitHub click here.

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A healthy relationship with technology

In our mission statement, the D-Team talks about “providing technical leadership and expertise,” which is accurate but not really the most conversational way of talking about what it is that we do. Lately I’ve been saying the D-Team’s role here at the RAC is “helping our staff and researchers have a healthy relationship with technology.” I thought it was time to dig into what that means a little. In thinking about this, I’ve realized this conceptualization of our work is has been strongly informed by some recent reading as well as conversations I’ve had with colleagues. Continue reading

Learning Python as a Processing Archivist: A Reflection

A large part of my first month at the RAC has been spent learning Python, Git, and GitHub.  As a processing archivist, who is also fairly new to the profession, I had no programming experience and was vaguely familiar with these tools. I began with a goal-orientated learning plan that essentially required me to learn enough of Python to be able to interpret an ArchivesSpace script. This experience not only taught me that programming is a powerful tool – but that it takes a sense of fearlessness to conquer a programming language.

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