Project Electron Update: Introducing Aurora 1.0

We are very pleased to announce the initial release of Aurora, an application to receive, virus check, and validate the structure and contents of digital records transfers. It provides a read-only interface for representatives of donor organizations to track transfers, so that they can follow their records as they move through the archival lifecycle. It also includes functionality for RAC staff to add or update organization accounts and users associated with them, appraise incoming transfers, and initiate the accessioning process. Aurora is built on community-driven standards and specifications, and we have released it as open source software. This is a major milestone for Project Electron, and we are excited to share it with the world. Many thanks to our partners at Marist College IT and to the Ford Foundation for their generous support of the project.

Aurora homescreen

We will continue to improve Aurora as we test and integrate it with a chain of other archival management and digital preservation tools.

Read more about Project Electron here.

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Project Electron November-December Update

In the last Project Electron update, I discussed the benefits of user interfaces as communication tools during development. This month I want to share more about the archival functions that those user interfaces enable in the application, which has been the focus of our recent development work. Specifically, I will share how the application enables appraisal and accessioning functions, as well as managing structured rights statements.

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Unveiling ArchivesSpace

As you should all know by now, we will be transitioning from ATReference to ArchivesSpace in a couple of months. It has been a lengthy project, but we’re quickly approaching its final stages. As such, I wanted to give everyone a quick rundown of the final timeline and the work that we are doing to get us there.

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Accessioning and Ingest of Electronic Records #1409

On October 25th, 2013 I attended SAA’s DAS workshop of Accessioning and Ingest of Electronic Records.  The workshop was hosted by Harvard and led by Erin Faulder, the Digital Archivist for Tisch Library at Tufts University.

The workshop covered key concepts and issues regarding policy decisions based on institutional mandates, suggestions for working with donors, key elements of the digital transfers, and the need for digestible workflows and guidelines.  There was a quick overview of the OAIS model with a breakdown of SIP’s, DIP’s, and AIP’s, and an emphasis to use the OAIS model as the foundation for the digital workflow each institution creates.  Two major themes emphasized throughout the workshop were 1) building trust and communication with donors, and 2) accessioning digital material goes beyond traditional accessioning and incorporates elements of appraisal and processing. Continue reading