Project Electron Update: Systems Integration Architecture

The underlying architecture that enables the movement of data between systems is a key aspect of Project Electron. In our project values, we talk about components as modular and generalizable, independently deployable and  flexible enough to accommodate integrations with changing systems. The project value to “support data in motion” recognizes the strength of duplicate and distributed data, and articulates Project Electron’s approach to systems as points at which humans interact with or manage that data. All of this is to say that our strategic decisions relating to choosing an approach to system architecture, particularly with regards to systems integration, is essential to the project’s success and sustainability. In this post, I’ll share some of our current thinking around the various systems integration models and our considerations in choosing an approach that will enable these integrations of archival applications. Continue reading

Shades of Similarity at Open Repositories

I attended my first Open Repositories conference in Brisbane, Australia two weeks ago. And while the RAC is still fairly new to the repository world and ecosystem, I picked up on a few trends that I think span across systems, institutions, and disciplines. Most of the attendees at the conference were coming from university library settings, but those institutions seemed to struggle with the same things we, as archivists, do: managing and maintaining a large infrastructure made of many systems, eliminating silos of information, and how to adapt to changing researcher or user needs. Sound familiar? If you said the above concerns made you think about what we’re trying to solve here with Project Electron, kudos to you. The entire conference I kept thinking about how it felt like almost everyone was trying to deal with the same issues we were, and in largely the same manners. Continue reading