Project Electron Update: Systems Integration Architecture

The underlying architecture that enables the movement of data between systems is a key aspect of Project Electron. In our project values, we talk about components as modular and generalizable, independently deployable and  flexible enough to accommodate integrations with changing systems. The project value to “support data in motion” recognizes the strength of duplicate and distributed data, and articulates Project Electron’s approach to systems as points at which humans interact with or manage that data. All of this is to say that our strategic decisions relating to choosing an approach to system architecture, particularly with regards to systems integration, is essential to the project’s success and sustainability. In this post, I’ll share some of our current thinking around the various systems integration models and our considerations in choosing an approach that will enable these integrations of archival applications. Continue reading

Managing Technical Debt: Code4Lib 2018 report

I’m just back from this year’s Code4Lib conference, held in Washington D.C. As I’ve written here before, it’s an event that is, without fail, productive, provocative and exhausting. Over the years, the things that have stayed with me from the conference have changed (arguably the focus of the conference has changed as well) from technological tools for solving problems to values and frameworks for thinking through problems. Continue reading

Project Electron November-December Update

In the last Project Electron update, I discussed the benefits of user interfaces as communication tools during development. This month I want to share more about the archival functions that those user interfaces enable in the application, which has been the focus of our recent development work. Specifically, I will share how the application enables appraisal and accessioning functions, as well as managing structured rights statements.

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International Digital Preservation Day 2017: RAC’s Disk Imaging Workflow Documentation Project

Over the past year, the RAC has been taking steps towards preserving digital media found within our collections. We have established new policies and moved away from separating digital media from their parent collection upon accessioning due to format. In the near future, we plan to institute a new workflow that involves processing archivists inventorying, imaging, and virus checking these materials during processing and recording their progress using the Digital Media Log. We are currently at the documentation stage of this project where we are working to develop and make available imaging workflows that encourage a comprehensive understanding of the transfer process. Continue reading

Reflection: A Year in the Life of an Audiovisual Archivist – Part 4

Audiovisual Access

I am not alone in the belief that access is an intrinsic part of preservation. In the past, the RAC — like many institutions — relied upon the creation of optical media discs (DVD or CD) for on-site researcher access. Beyond the person-hours required to create these discs, there were other issues such as retrieval time; the cumbersome process of loading discs into a player; and monitoring discs for on-going damage and wear and tear. My topmost concern, however, remained the long-term stability of these discs and the increasingly difficult-to-find drives necessary for playback. In short, we needed a new solution to the issue of audiovisual access.

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Project Electron October Update

As development of the Project Electron transfer application has continued over the past month, one important aspect of the work has been the creation of user interfaces based on the wireframes we have designed during the design planning process. In this month’s update, I will discuss how both wireframes and the resulting user interfaces (UIs) of the application are important communication tools both internally for the development team, and externally with user groups including Rockefeller Archive Center staff and donors. Continue reading

SHOT 2017: expertise and power

A few weeks ago, I attended the annual meeting of the Society for the History of Technology in Philadelphia. Along with my colleague Eira Tansey, I presented a paper titled “For Good Measure: The Role of Regulatory Records in Environmental Maintenance,” which made the case that environmental regulation relies on the work of recordkeeping. Eira was fresh off of delivering the opening keynote at NDSA’s Digital Preservation 2017: Preservation is Political, a talk which covered many of the same themes. Continue reading

Reflection: A Year in the Life of an Audiovisual Archivist – Part 2

Audiovisual Processing

I feel fortunate that the RAC has always gathered and/or maintained some form of documentation for their roughly 13,000 films, video, and audio elements. However, as with any archival institution, this information has been collected by several different individuals, who have sometimes employed different approaches over the course of many “eras” of RAC’s history. Applying consistency to audiovisual description became one of the first goals undertaken.

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